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Interactions between Plant Viruses and their Vectors (Advances in Botanical Research, Volume 36) (Advances in Botanical Research) by R. T. Plumb

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Published by Academic Press .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages275
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7324920M
ISBN 100120059355
ISBN 109780120059355

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Plant Virus-Host Interaction contains cutting-edge research in plant molecular virology, including pathogenic viroids and transport by insect vectors, interference with transmission to control viruses, and synergism, with pivotal coverage of RNA silencing and the counter-defensive strategies used by viruses to overcome the silencing response in plants. Direct interactions amid virus and the insect carrier comprises transmission and spread of the virus. by the arthropod for replicating inside the host plant, both deriving food from the same host plant. (Blanc and Michalakis ). Jan 09,  · There are five groups of persistent-propagative plant viruses: rhabdoviruses, reoviruses, bunyaviruses, marafiviruses, and tenuiviruses. Throughout the transmission cycle of a persistent-propagative virus, there is a close association between virus and vector that is dependent on specific agabbayetassocies.com by: 6. There are fi ve groups of persistent-propagative plant viruses: rhabdoviruses, reoviruses, bunyaviruses, marafi viruses, and tenuiviruses. Throughout the transmission cycle of a persistent-propagative virus, there is a close association between virus and vector that is dependent on specifi c interactions.

Viruses are transmitted from plant to plant predominantly by vectors, a process relying on the intricate interactions between host plants, viruses, and vectors. With the development of reverse genetics and the advent of high-throughput technologies, our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing the virus transmission process has substantially increased. Nov 09,  · Introduction—Insects as Plant Virus Vectors. The majority of plant viruses that cause disease in agricultural crops rely on biotic vectors for transmission and survival [ 1 ]. The largest class of plant virus-transmitting vectors are insects but other vectors Cited by: A variety of techniques have been used to examine plant viral genomes, the functions of virus-encoded proteins, plant responses induced by virus infection and plant–virus interactions. This overview considers these technologies and how they have been used to identify novel viral and plant proteins or genes involved in disease and resistance Cited by: This book attests to the huge diversity of research in plant molecular virology. Written by world authorities in the field, the book opens with two chapters on the translation and replication of viral RNA. Following chapters cover topics such as viral movement within and between plants, plant responses to viral infection, antiviral control measures, virus evolution, and newly emerging plant.

The genomes of viruses comprise a basic unit of replication-associated protein(s) and coat proteins to which are added modules including those that facilitate virus movement within the plant and between plants and defense against the host defense systems. Aug 09,  · The interactions plant viruses share with their insect vectors can either be “non-circulative” or “circulative.” In non-circulative interactions, the virus does not enter the insect body as part of the transmission process and the virus particles are retained in the stylet or the foregut region (Ng and Zhou, ). Viruses that are transmitted in a circulative manner in contrast, pass beyond the foregut into the insect Cited by: plant viruses are transmitted by vectors from one host to another, although they are efficiently disseminated by hu- man activities such as vegetative plant propagation, graft-. The demonstration by Hewitt et al. () that certain nematodes are vectors of plant viruses initiated research in Nematology and Virology that resulted in understanding of the transmission and etiology of an important group of soil-borne plant virus diseases. Vector Specificity.